Preservation & Interpretation of the Palace of Amenhotep III at Malqata in Western Thebes I

The Palace of Amenhotep III at Malqata is probably the best-preserved ancient Egyptian royal palace. It has been excavated principally by American missions, periodically for more than a century but, until our recent mission, little effort was taken to preserve, protect or interpret the site. Project Director: Peter Lacovara

The Palace of Amenhotep III at Malqata is probably the best-preserved ancient Egyptian royal palace. It has been excavated principally by American missions, periodically for more than a century but, until our recent mission, little effort was taken to preserve, protect or interpret the site. The proposed project is to strategize on site conservation and interpretation from multiple perspectives with the ultimate goal of the conservation and restoration the palace for proper visitation as part of a larger campaign of publication, excavation, and site management for the entire southwestern Theban area.

Project Details


Location: Luxor, Egypt, Northern Africa, Africa Organiser(s): The Metropolitan Museum of Art Funder(s): American Research Center in Egypt - Antiquities Endowment Fund Grant Funding received: $30,000 Commencement Date: 02/2014 Project Status: Completed
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