Endangered Hermitages: Documenting Coptic Heritage in Middle Egypt and the Eastern Desert

The Endangered Hermitages project aimed at conducting professional photographic survey and documentation of hermitages in the Eastern Desert, that are a significant testimony of how monks lived in remote deserts of Egypt from the 4th Century onwards. Project Director: Jan Ciglenečki

The Endangered Hermitages project aimed at conducting professional photographic survey and documentation (the wider geographical setting, architecture, graffiti and paintings) of the abandoned dynastic tombs and quarries reused as hermitages by Christian monks in late Antiquity in the broader area between Beni Suef and Sohag along the Nile Valley, as well as of the few anchoretic settlements in some parts of the Easter Desert. These hermitages are a significant testimony of how the monks lived in the remote deserts of Egypt from the 4th Century onwards. They provide us with invaluable information on the early history of Christian monasticism.

Project Details


Location: Egypt, Northern Africa, Africa Organiser(s): University of Ljubljana Funder(s): American Research Center in Egypt - Antiquities Endowment Fund Grant Funding received: $73,860 Commencement Date: 03/2018 Project Status: Completed
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