Documenting Iranxe-Mỹky, an endangered isolate language of Brazilian Amazonia

The Endangered Language Documentation Programme (ELDP) provides grants worldwide to for the linguistic documentation of endangered language and knowledge. Grantees create multimedia collection of endangered languages. These collections are preserved and made freely available through the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) housed at the library of SOAS University of London.

Mỹky is a severely endangered isolate language spoken by less than 100 people in Mato Grosso (Brazil) by two separate communities, Iranxe and Mỹky. The Iranxe community would like to preserve their dialect, spoken by only a declining number of elder speakers, and the knowledge of these remaining native speakers. This project aims to document the Iranxe variety of Mỹky and to enhance our understanding of this threatened isolate language, including its undescribed tonal system. The output will be recordings of narrative and conversational texts, transcriptions and annotations, and language materials for the community, and training of community documenters. Primary investigator: Bernat Bardagil-Mas

Project Details


Location: Brazil, South America, Brazil, Americas, United States of America Organiser(s): Endangered Languages Documentation Programme Project partner(s): University of California Berkeley Funder(s): Arcadia Funding received: £93,281.00 Commencement Date: 01/2014 Project Status: Active
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