Nar and Phu (Tibeto-Burman, Nepal): Field research for an audio-visual archive of comparative lexical and discourse material

The Endangered Language Documentation Programme (ELDP) provides grants worldwide to for the linguistic documentation of endangered language and knowledge. Grantees create multimedia collection of endangered languages. These collections are preserved and made freely available through the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) housed at the library of SOAS University of London.

Nar-Phu (Ethnologue: NPA, ca. 500 speakers, 84°15E; 28°40N) is a Sino-Tibetan language ofNepal which has shown a sharp decline in speakers due to emigration and the influence of nationaland other regional languages. This project will provide documentation and archival quality data onNar-Phu towards a comparative lexical database with Nepali and Nyeshangte. This project will alsoprovide a transcribed, annotated corpus to facilitate analyses of the discourse function of morphosyntacticstructures. Additionally, this project will provide for the community a Nar-Phu/Nepaliword-book aimed at primary school use, and copies of recordings for community archival andreference. Primary investigator: Kristine Hildebrandt

Project Details


Location: Nepal, Southern Asia, Asia Organiser(s): Endangered Languages Documentation Programme Project partner(s): Southern Illinois University Edwardsville Funder(s): Arcadia Funding received: £10,000.00 Commencement Date: 01/2006
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