Investigation and documentation of the morpho-syntax of Anindilyakwa

The Endangered Language Documentation Programme (ELDP) provides grants worldwide to for the linguistic documentation of endangered language and knowledge. Grantees create multimedia collection of endangered languages. These collections are preserved and made freely available through the Endangered Languages Archive (ELAR) housed at the library of SOAS University of London.

The two aims of this project are: (1) to document the morpho-syntax of Anindilyakwa, spoken by about 1500 people living on Groote Eylandt, Gulf of Carpentaria, Australia; and (2) create a basic learner’s grammar for future literacy programs. Anindilyakwa is a polysynthetic language, allowing a high degree of complexity in its word structure. It is endangered because of cultural breakdown, illiteracy, lack of teaching material and growing influence of English. This is manifested in the fact that the more complex forms are no longer being used by younger speakers today. This project focuses on the documentation of this morpho-syntactic complexity. Primary investigator: Marie-Elaine Van Egmond

Project Details


Location: Australia, Australia and New Zealand, Oceania Organiser(s): Endangered Languages Documentation Programme Project partner(s): University of Sydney Funder(s): Arcadia Funding received: £8,730.00 Commencement Date: 01/2007
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